Wednesday, April 06, 2011


March 2011 globally cooler:

Driven by the La Nina Pacific Ocean cooling event, global average temperatures in March 2011 were the coolest March since 1999, according to Dr. John Christy, professor of atmospheric science and director of the Earth System Science Center at The University of Alabama in Huntsville.

It was the fifth coolest March in the tropics, where the average temperature fell 0.35 C (about 0.63 degrees Fahrenheit) below seasonal norms.
Three of the five coldest tropical Marches in the 33-year satellite temperature record have happened in the past dozen years: 5th, 2011, -0.35 C: 3rd, 2000, -0.42; and 2nd, 2008, -0.58 C.

Global composite temp.: -0.10 C (about 0.18 degrees Fahrenheit) below 30-year average for March.
Tropics: -0.35 C (about 0.63 degrees Fahrenheit) below 30-year average for March.
March in the Sub-Continent:
Pakistan and NW India was slightly warmer, about 1/2c than average. While South India was cooler.

February was also below average:
February temperatures (revised):
Global Composite: -0.02 C below 30-year average
Tropics: -0.35 C below 30-year average

Ron writes and asks about the La-Nina and the Monsoon. Vagaries' Monsoon Watch Annual series discusses the various parameters pertaining to Monsoon development and progress. To all new readers, even though MW is published since the last 4 years, please read thru at least the last 2 years Monsoon Watch (2010 here and 2009 here)


This year, the first in the Monsoon Watch series will be up on Vagaries on 10th. April. Be sure to follow it and contribute your views.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

my electric power consumption for mar.2011 is 105 units less compared to mar.2010. (less power needed for AC) i am from mumbai.

NT said...

@Anonymous ... this does not prove anything in regards to the temperature in Mumbai in March, infact I don't recall many March months where the temperatures in Mumbai crossed 40 degree mark. One can argue that this March was hot enough for people not to use Geysers in the mornings and hence bring down their power bills. Also there are many other factors like number of days at home, guests in the house v/s no guests etc. etc. the corelation therefore is multivariate and difficult to establish