Thursday, September 06, 2007

The normal date of the widhrawal of the monsoon from the extreme west of India and Sindh region of Pakistan is 1st.September. Clear skies and absence of clouds is seen from this area in the satellite image of this morning. The streamline map shows westerlies from Pakistan pushing into Rajasthan. But this is only the initial development, and cannot be "officially" put as the widhrawal, but only initial "moves", as the monsoon trough is still north at the foothills of the Himalayas. This trough should also move south, and create a reversal of the winds. The monsoon low is still prevailing in the Thar Desert as seen in this MSLP chart.

Hence, a weak W.D. is pushing the rains south towards the central peninsula.

Similarly there is no monsoon system developing in the bay, showing, most probably, no further signs of systamatic rains now. What can be expected in the next 3/4 days is sporadic "widhrawal" thundershowers along the west coast, North India, and central India, but heavy rain along the monsoon trough and the eastern end of the trough.

For Mumbai, a heavy shower or two, or a thunder shower in the evening, for the next 2/3 days. The rain may decrease after that during the day, with thundershowers in the evenings.

Jim(Accuweather) has given very interesting information about the deep freeze in the Antartic.
With his permission, I reproduce his write up:
" Plenty of nastiness of late, weatherwise, on the icebound white continent of Antarctica. At the Vostok station, the low temperature of -80.8 degrees C, or -113.4 degrees F, marked the nadir for the winter of 2007. It is the lowest temperature that I have seen observed anywhere (out of a small handful of Antarctic weather stations). Sunday, Amundsen-Scott station (the South Pole) observed -73.4 degrees C, or -100.1 degrees F--winter`s coldest by 0.1 degree C"

Very interesting and "chilling" facts, Jim.





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