Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Wednesday 23rd March ...

As expected, the day got hotter in Maharashtra...some of Wednesday 23rd Maximum temperatures:
Several 40s today in Maharashtra....
Thane 42.3c, Solapur 41.9c, Malegaon 41.6c, Jalgaon & Chandrapur 40.2c, Sangli 40c, Nagpur 39.9c, Palghar 39.6c, Nashik 38.6c, Mumbai Scruz 38.2c, Pune 38c, Mahableshwar 34.5c, 

7 comments:

Abhijit said...

Badlapur(private reading) max temp 40.7°C with 10% humidity today.. Very hot & dry on eve of Holi festival which is mark as start of summer season ..

So sees first 40c mark temp of 2016 today on 23-Mar-2016 !!

sset said...

http://www.vagaries.in/2015_03_01_archive.html

As per vagaries knowledge base, last year 2015 march -> 1st half saw high temperatures over most of peninsular India, latter 3rd -4th week of march saw good amounts of rain. we had multiple days of LWD. Hopefully this happens this year also. Looks like el-nino has no influence on soaring March temperatures...

sset said...

Entire AP boils....Hottest March ever seen. Starting from North AP ramagundam - 41c to South AP
Tirupathi 43c... worst in store..

sset said...

AP heat wave (march itself) claims 10 lives

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/51534195.cms

emkay said...

Rajeshbhai, whats the effect of this heating up of the plains on the rains. Pre-monsoon breaking out soon in the south? Its getting to April and no substantial rains in March.

Karan Kumbhar said...

Skymet weather ... Ahmednagar breaks all time record .. max temperature 44.5 C !!!

Nilay Wankawala said...

CREDIT : THE HINDU

DATED : 12.01.2016

DROUGHT WORD HAS BEEN OFFICIALLY EXPUNGED BY IMD

The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has officially expunged the word “drought” from its vocabulary, months after it struck a contrarian note and correctly forecast one of India’s severest monsoon deficits last year.

According to a circular issued by the department last Thursday, the move is part of a decision to do away with or re-define terms that are not scientifically precise. Beginning this season, for instance, if India’s monsoon rainfall were to dip below 10 per cent of the normal and span between 20 and 40 per cent of the country’s area, it would be called a “deficient” year instead of an “All India Drought Year” as the IMD’s older manuals would say. A more severe instance, where the deficit exceeds 40 per cent and would have been called an “All India Severe Drought Year,” will now be a “Large Deficient Year”.

The IMD has never used the term “drought” in its forecasts and has maintained that declaring droughts was the prerogative of States. “Some confusion has been there over some years,” said B.P. Yadav, spokesperson for the agency, “and we wanted to be more precise.”

The agency had several definitions of drought: meteorological, hydrological and agricultural, and it was quite possible for a State to have a meteorological drought — 90 per cent shortfall of the average monsoon rainfall — but not suffer an agricultural drought —if the shortfall didn’t affect more than 20 per cent of the State’s area. “Declaring a drought has never been the IMD’s mandate and, in fact, not even that of the Central government,” said Shailesh Nayak, former Secretary, Ministry of Earth Sciences, to whom the IMD reports. “That’s because drought is not a measure of productivity (agricultural).”

Officials said the change in the nomenclature would not practically influence the way States viewed droughts.

The spokesperson for the agency said there would now be a standardised definition for heat waves and cold waves, and the IMD’s local arms would no longer use terms such as “could” or “may” to suggest the possibility of showers.