Wednesday, January 02, 2019


RAINFALL FOR THE PERIOD 1-10-2018 TO 31-12-2018



(SOUTHERN PENINSULA STATES)








RAINFALL ABOVE/BELOW NORMAL IN DESCENDING ORDER













ANDHRA PRADESH *



STATION ACTUAL NORMAL DIFF +/- %
SRIKAKULAM 276.6 285.6 -3
KRISHNA 157.5 241.7 -35
VIZIANAGARAM 149.7 249.7 -40
CHITTOOR 178.8 359.7 -50
VISHAKHAPATNAM 123.6 267.1 -54
SUBDIVISION RAINFALL 148.5 325.4 -54
NELLORE 277.6 632.9 -56
EAST GODAVARI 113.2 275.6 -59
GUNTUR 85.6 233.4 -63
WEST GODAVARI 98 274.6 -64
ANANTAPUR 53.4 160.8 -67
PRAKASAM 105.4 326.6 -68
CUDDAPAH 76.3 237.6 -68
KURNOOL 41.2 139.8 -71





TELENGANA *



STATION ACTUAL NORMAL DIFF +/- %
MAHABUBABAD 147.3 117.7 25
B. KOTHAGUDEM 112.5 122.1 -8
KHAMMAM 93.2 144.4 -35
M. MALKAJGIRI 77.9 121.1 -36
WANAPARTHY 57.9 107.9 -46
SANGAREDDY 53.4 108.2 -51
HYDERABAD 59.4 125.4 -53
J. BHUPALPALLY 50.5 115 -56
KUMARAM BHEEM 41.3 102.2 -60
MAHABUBNAGAR 41 108.5 -62
JOGULAMBA GADWAL 36.9 109.8 -66
RANGAREDDY 37.3 112.8 -67
WARANGAL_URBAN 36.8 111.8 -67
SURYAPET 45.2 141.2 -68
WARANGAL_RURAL 36 119.4 -70
VIKARABAD 30.7 116.4 -74
KARIMNAGAR 28.1 112 -75
JANGAON 30.9 128.3 -76
NAGARKURNOOL 27.7 114.1 -76
JAGTIAL 23.5 102.5 -77
MEDAK 23.1 110.8 -79
SIDDIPET 23.8 111.7 -79
MANCHERIAL 22.7 114.3 -80
NIRMAL 19.7 98.6 -80
KAMAREDDY 22.8 119.1 -81
ADILABAD 13.2 98.9 -87
PEDDAPALLE 13.8 116.1 -88
RAJANNA SIRCILLA 13.5 110.6 -88
NALGONDA 13.3 146.4 -91
NIZAMABAD 9.1 106.6 -91
Y. BHUVANAGIRI 13 145.7 -91





TAMILNADU AND PONDICHERRY



STATION ACTUAL NORMAL DIFF +/- %
TIRUNELVELI 519.7 467.2 11
COIMBATORE 325.1 328.9 -1
TIRUVARUR 710.6 719.1 -1
ARIYALUR 518.2 545.5 -5
KARAIKAL 952.4 1048.5 -9
RAMANATHAPURAM 440.3 491.7 -10
TIRUPPUR 282.1 314.3 -10
CUDDALORE 621.0 697.8 -11
TIRUVANNAMALAI 393.1 446.5 -12
NAGAPATTINAM 816.5 941.0 -13
NILGIRIS 416.3 478.2 -13
VILLUPURAM 435.8 499.1 -13
THANJAVUR 471.5 550.3 -14
THENI 302.1 357.9 -16
TOOTHUKUDI 348.7 427.0 -18
KANYAKUMARI 402.7 496.4 -19
SIVAGANGA 338.0 422.7 -20
PUDUKOTTAI 313.2 406.2 -23
PUDUCHERRY 632.4 843.1 -25
ERODE 228.0 314.6 -28
DINDIGUL 301.8 436.4 -31
MADURAI 278.4 419.1 -34
KANCHEEPURAM 417.1 641.8 -35
NAMAKKAL 182.5 291.6 -37
VIRUDHUNAGAR 265.5 419.0 -37
TIRUVALLUR 343.2 589.3 -42
PERAMBALUR 250.0 440.9 -43
TIRUCHIRAPALLI 208.0 391.5 -47
VELLORE 181.6 348.7 -48
SALEM 187.6 370.5 -49
KARUR 147.4 314.7 -53
CHENNAI 352.9 789.9 -55
KRISHNAGIRI 123.1 289.4 -57
DHARMAPURI 133.7 330.1 -59





KERALA



STATION ACTUAL NORMAL DIFF +/- %
KOTTAYAM 798.8 535.1 49
PATHANAMTHITTA 904.6 624.2 45
ERNAKULAM 706.2 489.3 44
ALAPUZHA 546.8 572.1 -4
CANNUR 324.9 345.1 -6
IDUKKI 526.4 564.2 -7
WYNAD 301 332.5 -9
MALAPPURAM 401 448.3 -11
KOZHIKODE 360.2 422.2 -15
THIRUVANANTHAPURAM 446.9 522.7 -15
KOLLAM 503.3 638.6 -21
THRISSUR 332.5 469.4 -29
KASARGOD 208.5 337.9 -38
PALAKKAD 266.7 428 -38





KARNATAKA *



STATION ACTUAL NORMAL DIFF +/- %
DAKSHINA KANNADA 324.7 333.5 -3
CHITRADURGA 121.2 158.2 -23
HAVERI 128.9 169.3 -24
MYSURU 163.0 213.3 -24
MANDYA 147.0 212.7 -31
KODAGU 196.4 289.7 -32
DAVANGERE 115.7 176.0 -34
BENGALURU RURAL 152.3 239.4 -36
UDUPI 197.5 316.0 -37
CHIKKAMAGALURU 144.8 237.1 -39
TUMAKURU 124.3 204.8 -39
HASSAN 132.5 219.4 -40
SHIVAMOGGA 108.2 189.8 -43
RAMANAGARA 136.4 242.4 -44
UTTARA KANNADA 107.1 210.0 -49
DHARWAD 84.4 165.9 -49
BENGALURU URBAN 105.5 230.6 -54
CHAMARAJANAGAR 112.8 243.7 -54
BALLARI 69.6 156.6 -56
KALABURGI 54.8 129.9 -58
KOLAR 93.2 227.6 -59
KOPPAL 54.5 141.5 -62
BELAGAVI 56.8 152.2 -63
RAICHUR 42.2 137.5 -69
CHIKABALLAPURA 61.8 223.5 -72
GADAG 43.4 161.2 -73
VIJAYAPURA 33.9 142.3 -76
BAGALKOTE 28.1 144.5 -81
BIDAR 21.2 119.2 -82
YADGIR 22.5 152.4 -85





STATES



STATE ACTUAL NORMAL DIFF +/- %
KERALA 465.5 480.7 -3
PUDUCHERRY 745.4 915.6 -19
TAMILNADU 336.5 440.4 -24
KARNATAKA * 97.9 187.3 -48
ANDHRA PRADESH * 121.2 279.9 -57
TELENGANA * 41.8 117.8 -65





* Data upto 26th Dec 2018.










Source IMD

9 comments:

sunny fernandes said...

Hardly any rain in Chennai during north East monsoon .

sset said...

South East India desertification I used to mention since last 3 years - but everyone in the blog made fun! Even now Rayalaseema is worse than west Rajasthan. Maybe in few years North East Monsoon will vanish (currents are becoming weaker every passing year).

sset said...

Thanks to GSB to bring NEM statistics in Vagaries.

Prabhakaran Subramaniyam said...

Extreme deficits. But none care to discuss even. Pathetic NE monsoon. Thank God, SWM was better to fill up interior dams. Otherwise can't imagine the situation in West/south TN distrcts.

sset said...

As a common person I feel more research needs to be done why is SWM (south west monsoon) and to some extent WD (western disturbances) with extended periods sometimes spanning from june - november dominating over feeble NEM (north-east monsoon) - currents are failing to reach Tamil Nadu and South Andhra Pradesh- leading to successive extreme droughts. Anyway no one can change way of nature ( well to some extent human activities (loss of trees, carbon emission) may have contributed to global current changes) unless stuff like Artificial Intelligence in future can change ocean currents (that is not possible nature has its own mysteries). Only solution is to bring waters of north (ganga,mahanadi,brahmaputra) to Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh (Cauvery water needs water from North) - unfortunately BJP(Modi) and Cong(Rahul) are busy with Rafale deals instead of river linking!

sunny fernandes said...

Skymet weather predicted excess rains for Tamil Nadu during north East monsoon .
But again the prediction was flop

NilaY Wankawala said...

Credit Australian government bureau of meteorology ENSO wrap up

Issued 8 January 2019

The latest ENSO Wrap-Up and Climate Model Summary are now available on the Bureau's website.

Some recent cooling in the tropical Pacific Ocean

Tropical Pacific Ocean surface waters have returned to ENSO-neutral temperatures after exceeding El Niño levels in November and early December. The Bureau's ENSO Outlook remains at El Niño ALERT.

While waters at and beneath the surface of the tropical Pacific have been warmer than average since mid-2018, atmospheric indicators of ENSO such as cloudiness, trade winds and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) have not responded and have mostly remained neutral. For an El Niño to become established, the atmosphere needs to reinforce and respond to the warmer waters at the ocean's surface. This reinforcement is what allows the widespread global effects on weather and climate to occur.

The recent cooling of tropical Pacific waters may partly reflect the movement of the Madden–Julian Oscillation (MJO), which has recently encouraged stronger trade winds over the tropical Pacific. However, the MJO is moving east, weakening the trade winds once again, which may allow the ocean surface to warm again.

Most models indicate sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific are likely to remain near El Niño levels at least until early autumn 2019. Models typically have less skill when forecasting through autumn compared with other seasons. If sea surface temperatures do maintain their anomalous warmth through summer, it increases the chance of El Niño emerging in 2019.

The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is neutral. The IOD typically has little influence on Australian climate from December to April.

More information

Media enquiries: (03) 9669 4057 media@bom.gov.au

Next update expected on 22 January 2019

NilaY Wankawala said...

GSB sir very well comilation and presentation of Data

NilaY Wankawala said...

compilation

Maharashtra temperatures on 16th March... Nights are still comfortable as in March Data provided by Shri Hosalikar (RMC Mumbai)